The Himalayan Cutia

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The Himalayan cutia “Cutia nipalensis” is a bird species in the family Leiothrichidae. This amazing species inhabits the Himalayan region, found from north India along the Himalayas Nepal, Bhutan, India, Pakistan, Burma, adjacent south China , Thailand, Laos, Vietnam and peninsular Malaysia. The Himalayan Cutia diet consists of insects, larvae, pupae, gastropods, insect eggs, seeds and berries and pine cones. The species breeding season start from April to June. The bird like to make nest is an open cup made of pine needles and moss, placed at base of a pine branch against the trunk, 3 to 3.5m above the ground, sometimes up to 20m in a broadleaf tree. The bird scientific name means "the khutya from Nepal". However, the Cutia is derived from the Nepali name for these birds, and nipalensis is Latin for "from Nepal". This beautiful bird natural habitat is tropical to subtropical humid montane forests. It is not a bird of the high mountains however, rather inhabiting br…

Rosy Starling

Pastor roseus, the adult of this species is highly distinctive, with its pink body, pale orange legs and bill, and glossy black head, wings and tail. Males in the breeding season have elongated head feathers which form a wispy crest that is fluffed and more prominent when the bird gets excited; the crest is shorter in winter and the black areas have paler feather edges, which get worn away as well as the black becoming more glossy in the breeding season. Winter plumage in males is rather dull. Females have a short crest and are duller overall, especially without the sharp separation between pink and black. The juvenile can be distinguished from common starling (Sturnus vulgaris) by its obviously paler plumage and short yellow bill. Young birds molt into a subdued version of the adult plumage, lacking the crest, in autumn and acquire the adult plumage when they are nearly one year old in females, and nearly two years in males. The latter in their second year wear a plumage similar to adult females but with longer crests and noticeably pale feather edges.

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